GREY METROPOLIS, the

Full length video

This film is in copyright

This film is protected by copyright and is provided for personal, private viewing only. Please use the Hire, buy or ask a question button to ask about obtaining a copy of this film or a licence to use it, or to ask about its copyright status.

Find similar films

Places:

  • Edinburgh

Subjects:

  • Arts and crafts

Genres:

  • Amateur

People/organisations:

  • Scottish Amateur Film Festival (SAFF)

Decade:

  • 1950s

Related films

LIVING GHOST, the
1959 | bw | sound
HAPPY WEEKEND
1951 | bwcol | silent
SILVER BUTCHER
1952 | bwcol | silent
ROBOT THREE
1951 | col | sound
KINTYRE
1955 | col | sound
GLASGOW, NO MEAN CITY
1951 | bw | silent

Please read Understanding catalogue records for help interpreting this information and Using footage for more information about accessing this film.

Overall rating:
(Your rating: )

Title: GREY METROPOLIS, the

Reference number: 2853

Date: 1952

Director: [filmed by J. T. Ritchie, N. McIsaac, R.Townsend]

Production company: [ Norton Park Group]

Sound: sound

Original format: 16mm

Colour: bw

Fiction: non-fiction

Running time: 15.00 mins

Description: The film shows the city through the thoughts and songs of R.L. Stevenson.

Winner of the Lizars Cup, Scottish Amateur Film Festival 1953.
Made by teachers at Norton Park School, Edinburgh,

Credits: Norton Park Production No. 3.
[cam. J. Lennie]
The thoughts of R.L.S. are spoken by Ian Gilmour
"Queen's Maries" and the "Willow Song" sung by Mary Sked and the "Gay Japanee" sung by Douglas McMahon.

Shotlist: A commentary of Edinburgh by R.L. Stevenson. gvs aspects of the city - streets, public buildings, l/s to old town, smoky cityscape, people (15 mins)


Donor's description:
"A remembrance of his Edinburgh days - and nights - by Robert Louis Stevenson. The camera pictures, or suggests, the rich and varied thoughts of R.L.S. With his sprightly character we see the city's character the better through her streets and lamps, kirk-bells and kirkyairds, pubs and closes, gardens and gutters, statues and stones. The version of How Many Miles to Babylon is chanted like it was in the 1870s."