ART AND AUDACITY: Dr T. J. Honeyman

Video 1 (currently displayed video)

Dr. Tom Honeyman laments the fact that the public has had no access to the art collection of Sir William Burrell, which has lain in storage for many years. (clip - full length available onsite)

Video 2

Dr. Tom Honeyman recalls his introduction to the world of art during lunchtimes in the Kelvingrove Art Gallery. (clip - full length available onsite)

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Subjects:

  • Arts and crafts
  • Leisure and recreation
  • Local government
  • Media, communication and the creative industries

Genres:

  • Television documentary

Series:

  • Dateline

Decade:

  • 1970s

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Please read Understanding catalogue records for help interpreting this information and Using footage for more information about accessing this film.

Overall rating:

Title: ART AND AUDACITY: Dr T. J. Honeyman

Reference number: T0576

Date: 1971

Director: d. James Sutherland

Production company: Scottish Television

Sound: sound

Original format: 16mm

Colour: col

Fiction: non-fiction

Running time: 26.19 min

Description: Dr Honeyman describing his decision to become professionally involved in the art world, and the purchase of the Burrell collection and Dali's "Crucifixion". With shots of the Art Gallery, Glasgow University and the collection in storage. Dr Honeyman and the Civic Amenities Committee Convenor in heated discussion in a TV studio.

See also ref. 1104

Credits: w. and presented Alex Dickson

Shotlist: STV Logo (0.07); Credits, superimposed over shot of Dr. Honeyman on the roof of the Co-op building overlooking the city (0.36); Shots of the presenter in the studio. He introduces the programme with reference to Honeyman's autobiography, his disatisfaction with the treatment of art in Glasgow, his purchase of Dali's "Crucifixion" and the Burrell Collection (2.21); Shots of the exterior of Honeyman's home in Dowanhill Street in Glasgow (2.40); Inside , his wife plays the piano (3.25); Dr Honeyman talks about his relationship with his last convenor (4.05); Exterior of the University of Glasgow (4.16); The university courtyard (4.32); View of the University from Kelvingrove Park (4.43); Exterior of the Mackintosh Building, Glasgow School of Art (4.57); Statue- lined corridor inside building (5.18); Exterior of the Art Gallery and Museum (5.32); Dr Honeyman enters the Art Gallery through the revolving door (5.39); Interiors of the Art Gallery (5.42); Honeyman settles down with his sandwiches and an apple in front of the painting "Two Strings to Her Bow" (5.58); Shots of the painting (6.03); Shots of Dr Honeyman and shots including Whistler's portrait of Thomas Carlyle, and Dali's "Crucifixion", (6.53); Honeyman and the programme presenter walk in the grounds of Glasgow University, with Honeyman in voice-over talking about the way in which he first became professionally involved in the art world (9.38); Shot of Art Gallery from Kelvingrove Park (9.48); Interiors of the City Chambers and in George Square (12.12); Interiors of the Art Gallery with shots of exhibits, including work by Monet and Cezanne (14.05); Cover of Honeyman's autobiography (14.11); Construction work underway at Charing Cross (14.54); Honeyman and the presenter in store where the Burrell collection is housed (16.44); Shots of some items from the collection. Dr Honeyman deplores the delay in exhibiting the entire collection (18.46); Heated studio discussion between Dr Honeyman, Councillor Mrs Constance Methven (Convenor , Glasgow Civic Amenities Committee) and William Samuels (ex-City Treasurer), mainly concerning the Burrell collection (26.54); End credits (27.25)